Local Food to Eat in Rome

Rome – the very mention of this city will have many previous visitors salivating in memory of delicious dining experiences. We've put together a list of just five dishes that are associated with the Italian capital.

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Al telefono

Whenever you're out and about in Rome and feeling a little peckish, try some truly tasty street food, such as supplì. A dollop of mozzarella is encased in a ball of rice, which is coated with egg and breadcrumbs before being deep-fried until golden, and then served with tomato sauce. Al telefono is the name given to supplì by locals because, when it's pulled apart, cheese strings are formed that resemble an old-fashioned telephone.

Pizza – the Roman way

Naples might be the original home of the Pizza but there's a classic capital-city variant that any visitor really should try. Roman pizza is typically made with a thin crust that is created with the addition of olive oil (and, sometimes, sugar). It's the oil, in particular, that helps provide the crust with its extra level of crispiness ?– and distinctive flavour. As far as toppings are concerned, variety is on the menu. That said, capricciosa is definitely a favourite, usually consisting of mozzarella, baked prosciutto, artichokes and tomatoes.

Carciofi alla Romana

As the name surely suggests, 'Roman-style artichokes' are a staple of many dining room tables in this area of Italy. Braised in white wine and olive oil and flavoured with garlic, mint and lemon juice, carciofi alla Romana is often served as an appetising antipasto.

Fettuccine Alfredo

A dish that is widely enjoyed by locals, fettuccine Alfredo was dreamed up by restaurant-owner Alfredo di Lelio in the city in 1914. Made with fettuccine, butter, cream and two types of cheese (Parmigiano-Reggiano and Pecorino Romano), and served with some judicious seasoning, it will leave you wanting to lick your plate clean.

Spaghetti cacio e pepe

A straightforward but most toothsome pasta-based dish is cacio e pepe, which is made with spaghetti (or, sometimes, tonnarelli). All that is added is a hard, salty cheese known as Pecorino Romano, black pepper, a little extra salt and a topping of the aforementioned cheese, grated. It might seem hard to believe that something so simple can taste so good – but it does.

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